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Course Syllabus

Course: ENGL 1015

Division: Humanities
Department: English & Philosophy
Title: Expository Composition (Extended)

Semester Approved: Spring 2017
Five-Year Review Semester: Spring 2022
End Semester: Spring 2023

Catalog Description: This course emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking skills through writing-intensive workshops. It explores writing situations as a complex process focusing specifically on idea generation relative to audience and purpose, working through multiple drafts, peer collaboration, and revision, and it includes rhetorical analysis. English 1015 differs from English 1010 by adding extra support for students during a fourth class session per week. English 1015 is recommended for students with ACT scores in English of 12-14.

General Education Requirements: English I (E1)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 3; Lecture: 4; Lab: 0

Justification: This course satisfies the E1 state composition requirement. A student who successfully completes ENGL 1015 will be able to write clearly, informatively, and persuasively in a variety of rhetorical situations. This writing-intensive course provides a foundation for all other college wiriting.

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum will have a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world, with particular emphasis on American institutions, the social and behavioral sciences, the physical and life sciences, the humanities, the fine arts and personal wellness.  Students will understand that writing is a complex process that includes idea generation relative to audience and purpose, working through multiple drafts, peer collaboration, revision, and rhetorical analysis. They will demonstrate their ability to effectively use the writing process and to communicate through writing and process assignments.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver information using a variety of traditional and electronic media. Students will read critically a substantial number of texts, paying attention to content, structure, and rhetoric. They will demonstrate their critical reading skills in class discussions, group activities, and informal and formal written responses.

3: A student who completes the GE curriculum can speak and write effectively and respectfully as a member of the global community, and work effectively as a member of a team. Students will write well-structured, rhetorically-effective prose and use an effective writing process to do so. They will demonstrate this skill through their formal writing assignments and the planning, drafting, and revising of them.

6: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively about nature, culture, facts, values, ethics, and civic policy. Students will develop critical thinking and reading skills. They will demonstrate an ability to critically assess and analyze theses, support, audience awareness, and purpose through written and oral responses to readings and/or their own essays.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Students will know how to accurately assess a rhetorical situation to determine the context, purpose, and audience for a given document. They will demonstrate their ability to select appropriate modes of discourse and support through various writing assignments.  

Students will be able to select a mode of discourse appropriate to the rhetorical situation. These may include exploring, entertaining, informing, and persuading. They will demonstrate this through writing assignments.  

Students will generate documents through a recursive writing process which involves discovery, drafting, reflection, and revision. They will demonstrate this through following each step of writing assignments, including responding to instructor feedback on their writing.  

Students will be able to explain a concept using levels of abstraction and specific detail appropriate to the rhetorical situation. They will demonstrate this through their ability to support various theses.  

Students will be able to rhetorically analyze a written argument. They will demonstrate this through written and oral responses to reading and/or their own essays.  

Students will develop critical thinking and reading skills. They will demonstrate an ability to critically assess and analyze arguments, support, audience awareness, and purpose through written and oral responses to readings and/or their own essays.  

Students will be able to organize a document in a way that helps the intended reader maximize comprehension. They will demonstrate a variety of organizational patterns in writing assignments. 


Content:
English 1015 is a process-oriented course that emphasizes the various stages of the writing process--discovery, drafting, reflection, revision, editing--in a workshop environment. Students will be expected to write several revised essays using various methods of development throughout the semester. Students will also be expected to read and respond critically to a variety of essays and perform rhetorical analyses. Students will meet one more time a week than English 1010 students, and this additional day will be designed using activities such as workshops, extra instruction, conferences, sentence-level and mechanics support, practice writing, and/or reading instruction.

Key Performance Indicators:
At the discretion of the instructor, a variety of assessment methods will be used: quizzes, exams, essays, and/or portfolios. Emphasis will be placed on the writing process; therefore, the revised essay will be the most beneficial method of assessment. Grading percentages will vary but should fall within these standards:

Revised prose: 30-60%  

Writing process assignments: 10-40%  

Reading assessments and other assignments: 20-40% 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Reading Critically, Writing Well. Axelrod, Bedford Writing Matters, Howard, McGraw Hill


Pedagogy Statement:


Maximum Class Size: 15
Optimum Class Size: 15