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Course Syllabus

Course: GEOG 1005

Division: Natural Science and Math
Department: Geology
Title: Physical Geography Lab

Semester Approved: Spring 2021
Five-Year Review Semester: Fall 2025
End Semester: Fall 2026

Catalog Description: This course is a practical application of the principles of physical geography such as identification of geographic processes and their results using maps and aerial photographs, and quantitative techniques such as measuring humidity, sun angle. (Lab fee required)

General Education Requirements: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 1; Lecture: 0; Lab: 2

Corequisites: GEOG 1000


Justification: This lab is an integral part of an introductory physical geography experience. It is offered to introduce physical geography students to the basic skills of a physical geography - working with data, interpretation of maps such as weather maps, topographic maps, identification of landforms on maps, photographs and satellite images. Together with GEOG 1000 this class meets the Physical Science requirement for G.E. at Snow College and is a common course number for other public colleges in Utah. The lab focuses on skills and applications of concepts covered in lecture. For the natural sciences, science is the systematic inquiry into natural phenomena organizing and condensing those observations into testable models and hypotheses, theories or laws. The success and credibility of science is anchored in the willingness of scientists to: 1) expose their ideas and results to independent testing and replication by other scientists which requires the complete and open exchange of data, procedures, and materials; 2) abandon or modify accepted conclusions when confronted with more complete or reliable experimental evidence. Adherence to these principles provides a mechanism for self-correction that is the foundation of the credibility of science. (Adapted from a statement by the Panel on Public Affairs of the American Physical Society which was endorsed by the Executive Board of the American Association of Physics Teachers in 1999.)

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum has a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world. The various lab exercises will lead to students having a deeper knowledge of the natural world such as determining sun angle, controls of seasons, temperature, humidity, winds, and weather. They will understand the controls of climate, biogeography, and soils. They will identify landforms and interpret the processes responsible for them. The student's fundamental knowledge of the natural world will be assessed by graded lab exercises, exams, quizzes.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read and research effectively within disciplines. This outcome is covered in the co-requisite for this class (GEOG 1000).

3: A student who completes the GE curriculum can draw from multiple disciplines to address complex problems. This outcome is covered in the co-requisite for this class (GEOG 1000).

4: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively. Students are required to take measurements, make calculations, construct and interpretgraphs and isolines, interpret maps, photos, and satellite data and images. The student's ability to reason analytically and creatively is measured by graded lab exercises, quizzes, or lab practical exams.

General Education Knowledge Area Outcomes:
1: Students will use the scientific method to attain, interpret and come to conclusions about real-world data such as measurements of sun angle, humidity, temperature, atmospheric pressure, and observations about the natural world. Graded lab exercises and lab exams or quizzes will allow students opportunities to display concept mastery. Students will use the scientific method to attain, interpret and come to conclusions about real-world data such as measurements of sun angle, humidity, temperature, atmospheric pressure, and observations about the natural world. Graded lab exercises and lab exams or quizzes will allow students opportunities to display concept mastery.


Content:
During this course, the following topics will be addressed using short pre-lab lectures and laboratory exercises. These topics will invite students to connect the science of geography to their lives and the lives of others. Landscapes, atmospheric processes, climate, and biogeography will be explored as a means of identity.-Latitude and Longitude and location on the globe-Time zones-Radiation and Temperature-Measuring solar angle-Seasons-Construction and Interpretation of Isolines including isotherms, isobars andcontours-Effects of elevation, continental position, ocean currents, and latitude onaverage temperatures-Air pressure-Winds-Atmospheric Stability-Atmospheric Humidity-Adiabatic Cooling and Heating of the Atmosphere-Biomes-Soils-Weather, Weather Maps, Maps, Fronts, and Atmospheric Pressure,weather synopses-Interpretation of weather satellite and/or radar images-Classifying Climate using the Koppen System-Basic Topographic Maps skills including scale, elevations, recognition offeatures such as hills, steepness, stream valleys, the direction of streamflow,recognition of common features both cultural and natural from symbols-Interpretation of landscapes using GoogleEarth or other satellite/aerial imagery-Landforms Reflecting Geologic Structure-Landforms related to Igneous Activity-Fluvial Landforms-Karst Topography-Glacial Landforms-Coastal Processes, Landforms, and Tides-Arid climate Landforms and processes

Key Performance Indicators:
Student learning outcomes will be evaluated using the following methods:

Lab Exercises 65 to 70%

Exams 0 to 35%


Representative Text and/or Supplies:
"Physical Geography Laboratory Manual for McKnight's Physical Geography A Landscape Appreciation" by Darrel Hess Current edition.


Pedagogy Statement:
Instructors will use lab exercises, demonstrations, and discussions, and group-work to engage and encourage learning. Instructors will work to become aware of the negative or oppressive experiences of marginalized students. They will demonstrate caring through attitude, expectations, and behavior. They will learn students' names, and learn about their backgrounds and social identities, and include their unique perspectives. Instructors will provide constructive feedback. They will foster opportunities for group work and peer-to-peer interaction.

Instructional Mediums:
Lab

IVC

Online

Maximum Class Size: 30
Optimum Class Size: 24