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Course Syllabus

Course: COMM 2150

Division: Fine Arts, Comm, and New Media
Department: Communications
Title: Intercultural Communication

Semester Approved: Spring 2018
Five-Year Review Semester: Spring 2023
End Semester: Spring 2024

Catalog Description: Intercultural Communication is a study of the ways people communicate within and between cultures, including a consideration of cultural contexts and the relationship between culture and communication. This class is aimed at developing a greater understanding about diversity and the intercultural aspect of everyday life. Intercultural diversity is present everywhere and understanding some of the cultural influence helps individuals gain acceptance and tolerance of other cultures.

General Education Requirements: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 3; Lecture: 3; Lab: 0

Justification: This course serves as an introduction to foundational and contemporary concepts, practices, and processes of intercultural communication. Student will be encouraged to use a variety of examples to use critical intercultural analysis, and to understand the scholarly field of intercultural communication. Students in this course will engage in a critical assessment of intercultural communication theories and applications with the explicit goal of addressing issues of social justice and ethical, mindful, and self-reflexive intercultural practices. Students will develop understanding of the world around them through study of content and the processes used by social and behavioral scientists to discover, describe, explain, and/or predict human behavior and social systems. The course will fulfill the Social and Behavioral Science General Education requirement. This course is most similar to COMM 2150 at Southern Utah University, where it also taught to fulfill the Social and Behavioral Science General Education requirement.

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum will have a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world, with particular emphasis on American institutions, the social and behavioral sciences, the physical and life sciences, the humanities, the fine arts and personal wellness.  Intercultural Communication asks students to think critically about their sense of cultural awareness and articulate a set of strategies for the development of intercultural communication competence. Students will be asked to demonstrate comprehension and utilization of concepts, theories and practices of interpersonal communication. Example may include a written analysis on characteristics of specific cultures and how generally one culture may adapt to another, regardless of which cultures they may be. Each paper will be returned with suggestions for improving written, organizational and contextual skills. Students will demonstrate their knowledge on these topics through written assignments, a group activity, quizzes and/or exams.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver information using a variety of traditional and electronic media. Students will engaged through multiple and diverse readings, examples from television and film, reflexive writing assignments, research activities, class discussions, and in-class activities. They will read a variety of primary texts and will be required to respond to the content. These texts will vary in nature to include some aspects of historical influences of human culture, the effects that cultures have on communication patterns, political movements, economical influences and societal trends. Students will demonstrate their knowledge on these topics through class discussions, research activities, written assignments, and quizzes and/or exams.

3: A student who completes the GE curriculum can speak and write effectively and respectfully as a member of the global community, and work effectively as a member of a team. Students will be encouraged to participate in a variety of activities used to enhance social relations and define roles within teams, often involving collaborative tasks. These activities are intended to improve performance in a team-based environment. Through classroom discussions, observations, and at least one group presentation students will demonstrate their ability to understand and manage conflict as part of a team.

6: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively about nature, culture, facts, values, ethics, and civic policy. Students will critically evaluate the ideas and themes of different communication practices of different cultures. They will be asked to identify the benefits along with the challenges of intercultural relationships and cultural differences in business and the workplace. Students will be able to read and analyze the constraints on communication and relationships among people of different cultures and make connections within the larger realm of past, and present. Students will look at the ethics of these issues. Students will demonstrate their ability to read and think critically about intercultural communication, understand its context, and interpret meaning through essay exams, papers, and class discussion.

General Education Knowledge Area Outcomes:
1: Through a variety of intercultural readings and class discussion students will be introduced to the history and influences of human culture and the effect that can be created on communication patterns. Some topics may include how cultures are influenced by communications, how communications influence cultures, and the contributions of human behavior and societies. Class discussions, projects, quizzes and/or exams will be used as tools to help students examine and demonstrate an understanding of historical periods and cultures from a social and behavioral science perspective.  Through a variety of intercultural readings and class discussion students will be introduced to the history and influences of human culture and the effect that can be created on communication patterns. Some topics may include how cultures are influenced by communications, how communications influence cultures, and the contributions of human behavior and societies. Class discussions, projects, quizzes and/or exams will be used as tools to help students examine and demonstrate an understanding of historical periods and cultures from a social and behavioral science perspective.

2: Develop and communicate hypothetical explanations for individual human behavior within the large-scale historical or social context. In order to become better intercultural communicators, students will start by examining the effect of culture on oneself. Students will then be encouraged to critically analyze many causes and effects of human behavior on the individual, communities, larger societies and globally. Through classroom discussion, projects, quizzes, and/or exams students will demonstrate their understanding and interpretations of the intricate nature of human behavior and culture.

3: Draw on the social and behavioral sciences to evaluate contemporary problems using social science research methodology. Students will develop skills to research, observe, and analyze intercultural communication in everyday life, popular media, and other mediated discourse. This may be done through the examination of a global issue where students will evaluate past, current, and future trends in human behavior and how one can use research methodology to solve real-world problems. Students will be encouraged to develop skills to engage in mindful, reflexive, and accountable dialogue through cultural differences. Through class discussion, quizzes and/or exams, students will demonstrate their ability to identify and understand various benefits and challenges involved with intercultural communication.

4: Describe and analytically compare social, political, economic, cultural, geographical, and historical settings and processes other than one’s own. Students will examine a variety of current and historical cultures, political movements, economical influences and societal trends. This may be done through a research project addressing how there are many different cognitive processes besides one's own. Geographical, and other physical influences will be addressed as an influence on culture and the development of societal trends. The students will be asked to analyze their basic assumptions and experiences regarding cultural controversies and social issues. Through writing projects, quizzes and/or exams students will be asked to try looking at the world from another perspective.

5: Explain and use the social-scientific method to test research questions and draw conclusions. Through textbook study, primary texts, and other sources, students will be asked to examine theories, case studies, and/or controversies within the societal trends, cultures and/or global issues. Students will be asked to demonstrate their ability to test research questions, find clear and well-reasoned arguments, and draw comprehensive conclusions. A completion of this outcome will be demonstrated through a group or individual project.

6: Write effectively within the social science discipline, using correct disciplinary guidelines, to analyze, interpret, and communicate about social science phenomena. This course stresses the relationship between clear, simple prose and thoughtful social analysis. By conducting original research, students learn to effectively use basic skills, such as sentence and paragraph construction, as well as advanced aspects of data analysis, and report organization. Students will be required to demonstrate effective writing skills in the social science disciple. A completion of this outcome will be demonstrated through a research paper.


Content:
This course will address topics ranging from the contested nature of culture and cultural definitions; privilege, power, and oppression in historical and contemporary U.S. society; globalization, transnational conflict, and modern technological influences in intercultural practices; representation of cultures and identities in popular media, and verbal and nonverbal codes and the relationship between language, power, and culture. These topics will be engaged through multiple and diverse readings, examples from television and film, reflexive writing assignments, research activities, class discussions, and in-class activities.

Key Performance Indicators:
Participation: 5 to 15%

Research activities and/or projects:  10 to 20%

Group project and/or presentation:  15 to 40%

Written assignments:  20 to 30%

Quizzes and/or exams:  15 to 40%


Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Martin, Judith N. and Nakayama, Thomas K. Intercultural Communication in Contexts (current edition.). Columbus, OH: McGraw Hill.

Myron W. Lustig and Jolene Koester Intercultural Competence: Interpersonal Communication Across Cultures (current edition). Boston, MA: Allyn Bacon.


Pedagogy Statement:
These topics will be engaged through multiple and diverse readings, examples from television and film, reflexive writing assignments, research activities, class discussions, and in-class activities.

Instructional Mediums:
Lecture

IVC

Online

Hybrid

Maximum Class Size: 35
Optimum Class Size: 25