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Course Syllabus

Course: HIST 1700

Division: Social and Behavioral Science
Department: Social Science
Title: American History

Semester Approved: Fall 2017
Five-Year Review Semester: Fall 2022
End Semester: Fall 2023

Catalog Description: This course is designed to provide an introduction into American history from pre-contact Native American societies through the present day.

General Education Requirements: American Institutions (AI)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 3; Lecture: 3; Lab: 0

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None


Justification: This course satisfies the American Institutions (AI) requirement established by theUtah Legislature and USHE. It provides a foundation for understanding the history of America.

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum will have a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world, with particular emphasis on American institutions, the social and behavioral sciences, the physical and life sciences, the humanities, the fine arts and personal wellness.  After completing this course, students are prepared to recognize and appreciate the diversity of ideas that constitute American history. Students read and discuss a variety of primary sources in order to understand these ideas from a variety of perspectives. Class discussions, written assignments, and exams will ask students to consider readings in a variety of contexts.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver information using a variety of traditional and electronic media. After completing this course, students are prepared to work competently with a variety of media sources as they engage in analysis of American history. Students read, watch, and listen to a variety of primary media and are assessed, in discussion and written response, on content. Class discussions, written assignments, and exams are designed to elicit constructive and critical responses.

6: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively about nature, culture, facts, values, ethics, and civic policy. Students must demonstrate an understanding of cultural and historical influence to some degree in every class discussion, written assignments, and exam. Understanding "America" and its history requires reasoning analytically, critically, and creatively about multiple factors.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Analyze, contextualize, and use primary source documents to understand the history of the United States. Through the study of primary source documents students will examine a variety of factors that explain the origins, development, and current dynamics of the political, social, and economic system of United States. Class discussions, written assignments, and exams will allow students to demonstrate they can articulate ways in which scholars and critics have addressed these factors; they will also allow students to demonstrate they can participate in the conversation. 

Explain and use historically relevant information. Students will be introduced to the disciplinary standards of History. Through reading primary and secondary sources, students will understand how to evaluate and use historically relevant information to make and critique arguments about American history. Students will be asked to demonstrate their ability to use historically relevant information in class discussions, written assignments, and exams.  

Communicate effectively about the history of the United States. Students will be able to communicate knowledge, analysis, and critiques of the history of the United States. This communication will be demonstrated in written assignments and class discussions, with feedback provided by both instructor and/or peer comments.  

Engage a diversity of viewpoints in a constructive manner that contributes to a dialogue about the history of the United States. Through reading a range of sources, students will understand multiple viewpoints on the history of the United States. They will be able to discuss these viewpoints in historical context and be able to articulate connections with contemporary issues. Class discussions, written assignments, and exams will allow student to make their own contribution to the dialogue about the history of the United States. 

Use historical methods to come to an understanding of the United States that integrates diverse viewpoints. Students will be introduced to the methods of History. Through reading diverse primary and secondary sources within this discipline, students will understand how to use these methods to come to an understanding of the United States that reflects the diversity of viewpoints within historical scholarship. Students will be asked to demonstrate their ability to use historical methods in the context of American civilization via written assignments, exams, and classroom participation. 


Content:
The course traditionally follows a chronological path, analyzing how politics, culture, and societal factors shaped American identity. The course takes broad purview of American history, looking at larger transformations across time, while also more closely examining how individuals and groups caused and responded to these larger changes. Both primary and secondary source reading assignments are intended to present a more complete picture of early American history.
Possible Topics:
• Pre-Contact Native American Societies
• Old World/New World
• Colonization of the New World
• The American Revolution
• The Constitution
• War of 1812
• Jacksonian Era
• Antebellum Slavery
• Civil War Reconstruction
• Gilded Age and Progressive Era
• The Jazz Age
• The Great Depression and the New Deal
• World War II
• Society in Flux-the Nation Transformed

Key Performance Indicators:
Exams: 30%-60%  

Assignments/Essays: 30%-60% 

Participation: 10%-20%  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Major Problems in American History, Vol I. 3rd Edition.

Cengage Learning.

History in the Making: A History of the People of the United States of America to 1877


Pedagogy Statement:


Maximum Class Size: 130
Optimum Class Size: 25