Skip to content

Course Syllabus

Course: PSY 1010

Division: Social and Behavioral Science
Department: Behavioral Science
Title: General Psychology

Semester Approved: Fall 2017
Five-Year Review Semester: Fall 2022
End Semester: Fall 2023

Catalog Description: This course offers an introductory survey of general psychology theories and concepts with an emphasis on the scientific study of human behaviors and applications in daily life.

General Education Requirements: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 3; Lecture: 3; Lab: 0

Prerequisites: N/A

Corequisites: N/A


Justification: This course fulfills a General Education requirement. It is a prerequisite for all succeeding psychology courses. It is a required course for majors in numerous fields of study. This course transfers to all institutions in the state of Utah.

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum will have a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world, with particular emphasis on American institutions, the social and behavioral sciences, the physical and life sciences, the humanities, the fine arts and personal wellness.  The discipline of psychology emphasizes the connection between the individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as they relate to the larger social and cultural framework. In an introductory course, students will be exposed to different cultural ideas, norms, and values. They will learn how social and behavioral sciences explain individual as well as group behaviors - and how such behaviors have reciprocal influences. They also learn how to apply social and behavioral principles to improve their personal lives. This is assessed through Written Assignments, Tests and Quizzes, Individual Multimedia Presentation Assignments, and Collaborative Investigation Project and Presentations.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver information using a variety of traditional and electronic media. Psychology's paramount endeavor is scientific accuracy. Hence, a student's ability to acquire the skill of gathering, analyzing, replicate, and synthesizing academic literature within the discipline is extremely important. Students will learn where to find valid literature, how to evaluate the methods and claims of such literature, and use the information the find to inform their personal projects. This will be primarily accomplished with written assignments and collaborative investigation projects.

6: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively about nature, culture, facts, values, ethics, and civic policy. Students in psychology will be required to think critically in several different domains: First about their own thoughts, feelings, and actions - and the influences thereon. Then, they are asked to think about how the actions and intents of others can influence them. Then, they must evaluate pseudoscience using critical thinking and methodological tools. Finally they use all the skills from the aforementioned to assess the utility of professional research articles. They learn to use critical thinking in evaluating facts, claims, ethics, and more. This is assessed through Written Assignments, Tests and Quizzes, Individual Multimedia Presentation Assignments, and Collaborative Investigation Project and Presentations.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Explain social institutions, structures, and processes across a broad range of historical periods and cultures from a social and behavioral science perspective.
Students will become knowledgeable about processes that effect human thought, emotion, and behavior. They will also gain a basic understanding of how culture and established social structures can influence individuals. This will be assessed through class discussion, personal reflection, written assignments, and tests/quizzes.  

Develop and communicate hypothetical explanations for individual human behavior within the large-scale historical or social context.
As emerging social scientists, students in Introduction to Psychology will learn how to apply existing theories about human behavior, develop new theories, and empirically test such theories. Students will also consider how influences outside the individual impact behaviors. This will be assessed through Collaborative Investigation Projects, Individual multimedia presentations, and written assignments.  

Draw on the social and behavioral sciences to evaluate contemporary problems using social science research methodology.
Similar to above, students in Introduction to Psychology will learn how to develop new theories about human behavior, apply existing theories, and empirically test such theories in the context of individual and social problems. This will be assessed through Collaborative Investigation Projects, Individual multimedia presentations, and written assignments.  

Describe and analytically compare social, political, economic, cultural, geographical, and historical settings and processes other than one's own.
Through a variety of media such as videos, readings, interviews, etc. students will be exposed to ideological, cultural, and social ideas that may challenge their paradigm. This challenge will provide them with a better understanding of themselves, others, and the social world in which they live. Students will be encouraged to respectfully examine these perspectives as adding value and variety to society and individual life. They will display this understanding in class discussion, reflection, and individual multimedia presentations.  

Explain and use the social-scientific method to test research questions and draw conclusions.
Introduction to Psychology Students will learn how to how to apply existing theories about human behavior, develop new theories, and empirically test such theories - using sound scientific methodology. Students will receive instruction in up-to-date and rigorous social science research methods, and will be required to use them in Collaborative Investigation Projects, Individual multimedia presentations, and written assignments.  

Write effectively within the social science discipline, using correct disciplinary guidelines, to analyze, interpret, and communicate about social science phenomena.
Students will acquire the skill of gathering, analyzing, and synthesizing academic literature in the field of psychology. They will become capable of adhering to APA writing standards and practices. This will be primarily accomplished with written assignments and collaborative investigation projects.  


Content:
Introduction to Psychology is a course that engages students in the scientific study of the human mind and behavior. Through a variety of class activities students utilize different theoretical and analytical lenses to examine topics such as:
* Thinking Critically with Psychological Science
* Neuroscience & Behavior
* Nature, Nurture, and Human Diversity
* Developing Through the Lifespan
* Sensation & Perception
* States of Consciousness
* Learning & Memory
* Thinking, Language, & Intelligence
* Motivation
* Emotions, Stress, & Health
* Personality
* Psychological Disorders
* Therapy
* Social Psychology.

Key Performance Indicators:
Written Assignments: 15 - 30% of final grade  

Tests and Quizzes: 25 - 45% of final grade  

Individual Multimedia Presentation Assignments: 10 - 25% of final grade  

Collaborative Investigation Project and Presentation: 20 - 40% of final grade  

 

 

 

 

 

 



Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Schacter, D. L., Gilbert, D. T., & Wegner, D. M. (2017). Introducing Psychology. (3rd Ed.) New York, NY: Worth Publishers.


Pedagogy Statement:


Maximum Class Size: 110
Optimum Class Size: 35