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Course Syllabus

Course: MATH 1030

Division: Natural Science and Math
Department: Mathematics
Title: Quantitative Literacy

Semester Approved: Fall 2021
Five-Year Review Semester: Summer 2026
End Semester: Summer 2027

Catalog Description: Quantitative Literacy is about viewing Mathematics from a countable, predictable, and creative standpoint. We learn how and where we find geometry, pattern, logic, cryptography and statistics in our natural world and in society. The discoveries are made using a little bit of algebra, art, trigonometry and other skills to critically process the concepts in the course.

This course is designed for students seeking an AA or non-stem AS degree. Math 1030 is not a prerequisite for Math 1040, 1050 or 1060.

General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy (MA)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 3; Lecture: 3; Lab: 0

Prerequisites: Math 850 (Math Literacy) or Math 1010 (Intermediate Algebra) with a C or better, ACT math score of 23 or higher or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or you must retake the placement test.

Corequisites: none


Justification: This course accomplishes the objectives of the Quantitative Literacy requirement in the State of Utah and is an option for students seeking to fulfill the mathematics requirement for an AA or AS degree. Through an agreement with USHE, this course is equivalent to the Quantitative Literacy course at all state institutions and carries the same prefix and number.

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum has a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world. This course, more than any other in the department allows students to explore both familiar and unfamiliar branches of math connect them to patterns in the natural world and processes in society. One example includes the Fibonacci sequence and its relation to spiral growth of many things from seashells to pinecones and broccoli to ferns. Another is the relation between topology, graph theory and game theory and their uses in CGI technology for movies and video games. The ability to explain how mathematics is found in nature and society will be assessed through homework, exams, quizzes, student projects and/or presentations.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read and research effectively within disciplines. This course allows students to not just solve equations and use numbers but explore math ideas and theorems in history, politics, art and other areas through websites, texts including the course textbook and other forms of research. They are then asked to explain what they have learned in their homework, exams, quizzes, projects and/or presentations.

3: A student who completes the GE curriculum can draw from multiple disciplines to address complex problems. Different facets of the course ask students to explore how math relates to things like computer science, banking, the statistics used in sports journalism and psychology, politics and voting theory and many more. Complex situations from these and other subjects are assessed through exams, quizzes, projects, and/or presentations.

4: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively. Students are asked to use analytical and critical thinking in this course as they are presented with problems in homework, exams and quizzes that ask for students to interpret information and then decide which of the concepts learned in class relates best to the question at hand. They are also asked to explain their reasoning as to how they came to their conclusions. There is not always one “right answer” to the problem. Other assignments are opportunities to take what they have learned in class and either on their own or in groups create projects and presentations that may include videos, art, computer programs, songs, poetry and more. As stated above, these abilities are assessed through exams, quizzes, projects, and/or presentations.

6: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason quantitatively.  The course contains plenty of numbers, graphs and huge mathematical ideas. Students grapple with numbers in voting theory, the Pigeon- hole principle, Knot theory, the intricacies and patterns of the Fibonacci sequence and many others allow students to ponder, think about and create new patterns inside the world of quantitative reasoning. This reasoning is assessed through exams, quizzes, projects, and/or presentations.

General Education Knowledge Area Outcomes:
1: Students will be able to interpret various graphs, diagrams, equations, tables, etc. and use them to draw quantitative conclusions about questions in the course as well as explain their reasoning. This outcome will be assessed through homework, exams, quizzes and/or student projects and presentations. Students will be able to interpret various graphs, diagrams, equations, tables, etc. and use them to draw quantitative conclusions about questions in the course as well as explain their reasoning. This outcome will be assessed through homework, exams, quizzes and/or student projects and presentations.

2: Convert relevant information into various mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, and tables). Students will be able to make and interpret various graphs and charts. This outcome will be assessed through homework, exams, quizzes, presentations and/or projects.

3: Demonstrate the ability to successfully complete basic calculations to solve problems. Students will be able to perform basic calculations to solve problems. While this course uses very little algebra, several other branches of mathematics discussed in this course also require calculations. This outcome will be assessed through homework, exams, quizzes and/or student projects and presentations.

4: Demonstrate the ability to problem solve using quantitative literacy across multiple disciplines. Make judgments and draw appropriate conclusions based on quantitative analysis of data, recognizing the limits of this analysis. This course can span concepts across mathematics, economics, politics, history and many other disciplines. In the course of their mathematical explorations, students will demonstrate their problem-solving (making judgements and evaluating their conclusions) through homework, exams, quizzes and/or student projects and presentations.

5:  Students will provide quantitative evidence for their answers/conclusions by showing their calculations and using graphs, charts, tables and drawings. This outcome will be assessed through homework, exams, quizzes and/or student projects and presentations.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Constructing quantitative, logical arguments. In addition to devising, executing and checking a plan for solving a problem, students must also develop the ability to communicate their work and results in a succinct manner using clearly constructed quantitative and logical arguments. This ability to construct quantitative and logical arguments will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations or assignments.

Understanding and using mathematics as a language to communicate As students develop a deeper understanding of mathematics in a variety of contexts, they will also be expected to both understand and use the language of mathematics to convey quantitative ideas, processes, and results to others. This ability to understand and use mathematics as a language to communicate will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations and/or assignments.

Exploring and analyzing mathematical concepts using technology as appropriate. Students will also be expected to use various forms of technology (i.e. calculators, mathematics software, presentation software, applets, protractors, rulers, etc.) in order to deepen understanding and mastery of mathematical concepts. Through collaborations, research and intuition, students will gain experience determining the most appropriate and effective technology to use for a given situation or problem. This ability to explore and analyze mathematical concepts with the aid of appropriate technology will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations and/or assignments.

Estimating, reasoning through and making sense of mathematical processes and results. Another critical goal of this course is to encourage students to critically examine and make sense of mathematical processes and results. Understanding why a specific approach may be most appropriate or what a result truly means within the context of a real world problem will help students make meaningful connections between their newly acquired knowledge and their prior knowledge. This ability to estimate, reason through and make sense of mathematical processes and results will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations or assignments.


Content:
This course may include any of the following:
Game-theory, problem-solving, critical thinking and logic
Counting, patterns in nature, primes, modular arithmetic, cryptology and sets
Infinity with multiple contexts
Trigonometry, the golden ration, symmetry, non-Euclidian geometry and dimensions
Topology
Graph theory, Euler circuits, Hamiltonian circuits and networking
Fractals, Julia sets and the Mandelbrot set
Probability
Statistics
Risk, money and voting

This course supports an inclusive learning environment where diverse perspectives are recognized, respected and encouraged through readings, projects and/or presentations. Students are invited to explore additional concepts in their projects and present them in a way that they find most interesting and most relatable. They are also assigned to multiple groups over the course of the semester where they can share their perspectives and learn from others perspectives and life experiences.

Key Performance Indicators:
Student learning will be evaluated through

Attendance/Participation 0 to 15%

Group Work 0 to 15%

Presentations/Projects 0 to 20%

Quizzes 0 to 20%

Homework 5 to 25%

Midterms 20 to 70%

Final Exam/Final Project 15 to 35%


Representative Text and/or Supplies:
The Heart of Mathematics, An Invitation to Effective Thinking; Current Edition; Burger/Starbird; pub: Wiley


Pedagogy Statement:
Many high impact practices are proving to be of value to students of all backgrounds. Based on that knowledge, teachers of this course regularly use many teaching/learning methods such as group work, discussion, lecture, online sources for both learning and homework, group and individual presentations, manipulatives, traditional paper and pencil homework that allows students to demonstrate their learning. A sense of community is developed in this course as students sit together at round tables and work in several different groups throughout the course of the semester.

Instructional Mediums:
Lecture

IVC

Online

Maximum Class Size: 25
Optimum Class Size: 25