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Course Syllabus

Course: MATH 1030

Division: Natural Science and Math
Department: Mathematics
Title: Quantitative Literacy

Semester Approved: Fall 2015
Five-Year Review Semester: Fall 2020
End Semester: Fall 2021

Catalog Description: This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling and problem solving utilizing algebra, discrete mathematics, geometry and statistics. Furthermore, students will examine some of the greatest ideas of humankind ideas comparable to the works of Shakespeare, Plato, and Michelangelo. Imagination, creativity, and sound logic will all be crucial components of these mathematical explorations. The overarching theme of the course is to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for math and its many applications to the world around us. There are three basic goals for this course: To attain a better understanding of some rich mathematical ideas; To build sharper skills for analyzing life issues that transcend mathematics; To develop a new perspective and outlook on the way you view the world.

General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy (MA)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 3; Lecture: 3; Lab: 0

Prerequisites: Math 0850 or Math 1010 with a C or better course grade, ACT math score 21 or higher or appropriate placement test score.

Corequisites: none


Justification: This course is part of the state mandated general education core along with Math 1040 (Introduction to Statistics) and Math 1050 (College Algebra). It is required as the math general education course for some majors. This course is transferable to all state institutions as Math 1030.

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum will have a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world, with particular emphasis on American institutions, the social and behavioral sciences, the physical and life sciences, the humanities, the fine arts and personal wellness.  ? Learning the history of mathematics and of many famous mathematicians, students will gain insight and increased understanding of cultures throughout the world. ? Studying, researching, and presenting on how mathematics plays a role in many fields (i.e. science, art, music, education, business, and personal wellness) will also give students a more developed understanding of the versatility of mathematical reasoning and communication. ? Sharing personal experiences and insight pertaining to mathematics within their own world also gives students a more meaningful connection to the unique cultures, values, and behaviors of their classmates. ? These abilities of students to study, discuss, and critically explore their fundamental knowledge and experiences pertaining to human cultures and the natural world will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver information using a variety of traditional and electronic media. ? A major goal of this course is to help students carefully examine a given problem, identify essential, extraneous, and missing information, and to devise and execute a plan for solving the problem using this information and for checking the results when finished. ? Students will also be expected to use various forms of technology (i.e. calculators, mathematics software, presentation software, applets, protractors, rulers, etc.) in order to deepen understanding and mastery of mathematical concepts. Through collaborations, research, and intuition, students will gain experience determining the most appropriate and effective technology to use for a given situation or problem. ? These abilities of students to read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver information using appropriate media will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments.

4: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason quantitatively in a variety of contexts. ? Another goal of this course is to encourage students to critically examine and make sense of mathematical processes and results. Understanding why a specific approach may be most appropriate or what a result truly means within the context of a real world problem will help students make meaningful connections between their newly acquired knowledge and their prior knowledge. ? These abilities of students to use quantitative reasoning to examine and make sense of a variety of real world problems in context will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments.

6: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively about nature, culture, facts, values, ethics, and civic policy. ? In a dynamic, technology-driven world, citizens are expected to have the requisite skills to navigate, process, and synthesize the vast amounts of available knowledge in order to critically and creatively solve increasingly complex problems. The nature of this course necessitates continual use of numbers, graphs, tables, logic, and quantitative reasoning to effectively solve and interpret these real world problems in context. As students develop these problem-solving skills, they will be empowered to better contribute to positive social change in their workplace and their communities. ? This ability to reason analytically, critically, and creatively to solve real world problems in context will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Applying mathematical knowledge to real world problems. In a dynamic, technology-driven world, citizens are expected to have the requisite skills to navigate, process, and synthesize the vast amounts of available knowledge in order to critically and creatively solve increasingly complex problems. As students develop these problem-solving skills, they will be empowered to better contribute to positive social change in their workplace and their communities. This ability to apply mathematical knowledge to real world problems both collaboratively and individually will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments. 

Interpreting and critiquing quantitative information or arguments. A major goal of this course is to help students carefully examine a given problem, identify essential, extraneous, and missing information, devise and execute a plan for solving the problem using this information, and check their results when finished. This ability to interpret and critique quantitative information will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments. 

Constructing quantitative, logical arguments. In addition to devising, executing, and checking a plan for solving a problem, students must also develop the ability to communicate their work and results in a succinct manner, using clearly constructed quantitative and logical arguments. This ability to construct quantitative and logical arguments will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments. 

Understanding and using mathematics as a language to communicate. As students develop a deeper understanding of mathematics in a variety of contexts, they will also be expected to both understand and use the language of mathematics to convey quantitative ideas, processes, and results to others. This ability to understand and use mathematics as a language to communicate will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments. 

Exploring and analyzing mathematical concepts, using technology as appropriate. Students will also be expected to use various forms of technology (i.e. calculators, mathematics software, presentation software, applets, protractors, rulers, etc.) in order to deepen understanding and mastery of mathematical concepts. Through collaborations, research, and intuition, students will gain experience determining the most appropriate and effective technology to use for a given situation or problem. This ability to explore and analyze mathematical concepts with the aid of appropriate technology will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments. 

Estimating, reasoning through, and making sense of mathematical processes and results. Another critical goal of this course is to encourage students to critically examine and make sense of mathematical processes and results. Understanding why a specific approach may be most appropriate or what a result truly means within the context of a real world problem will help students make meaningful connections between their newly acquired knowledge and their prior knowledge. This ability to estimate, reason through, and make sense of mathematical processes and results will be assessed via quizzes, exams, projects, presentations, or assignments. 


Content:
Through lecture, instruction, group work, and various other methods, this course may include any of the following topics:
• Game theory, problem-solving, critical thinking, and logic
• Counting, patterns in nature, primes, modular arithmetic, cryptology, and sets
• Infinity within multiple contexts
• Trigonometry, the golden ratio, symmetry, non-Euclidean geometry, dimensions
• Topology
• Graph theory, Euler circuits, Hamiltonian circuits, networking
• Fractals, Julia sets, Mandelbrot set
• Probability
• Statistics
• Risk, money, and voting

Key Performance Indicators:
Student learning will be evaluated through

quizzes (0-20%) 

exams (20-70%) 

projects and presentations (0-20%) 

assignments (5-25%) 

participation (0-10%) 

 

 

 

 

 



Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Burger and Starbird, The Heart of Mathematics, An Invitation to Effective Thinking, current edition


Pedagogy Statement:


Instructional Mediums:
Online

Maximum Class Size: 25
Optimum Class Size: 25