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Academic Policies

Academic Integrity
Academic Standards Policy
Academic Credit
Academic Appeals
Alternate Final Exams Times
Excused Examinations
Excused Absence Policy

Academic Integrity

1.0 PURPOSE

Snow College’s primary mission is to advance students in the achievement of their educational goals, empowering and preparing them to participate, work, serve, and engage capably, knowledgeably, and responsibly in a complex and changing world. Just as it is a privilege for Snow faculty and staff to help students work toward this purpose, it is likewise a privilege for Snow students to have access to such academic opportunities. This being the case, Snow students share in the College’s general commitment to acting and learning with integrity. 

Integrity means being whole, undivided, and honest and acting upon strong moral principles, in one’s words and personal behavior, and also publicly within the larger community. Just as integrity entails a sound personal character and adherence to moral and ethical principles, academic integrity also entails adherence to basic academic standards. Practicing academic integrity also helps students establish patterns of integrity for their personal, professional, and public lives. Failing to uphold standards of academic integrity compromises the learning process for individual students, and threatens to degrade and devalue it for others.

Snow College expects all students to uphold the highest standards of academic integrity, and requires students to submit work for academic credit that reflects their own learning, skills, and best efforts. A student who cheats, commits fraud, or plagiarizes is in violation of this principle. Academic Dishonesty or any violation of Academic Integrity are not tolerated by the College.

2.0 DEFINITIONS

2.1. Academic Dishonesty: Any violation of academic integrity. Definitions and examples of the most common forms of Academic Dishonesty are provided below for the sake of clarity. (This list is instructive rather than exhaustive.)

2.2. Cheating is the use, gift, or acquisition, of unauthorized assistance, or of other activity that violates stated assignment or testing protocol. The following behaviors are considered cheating:

       2.2.1. using unauthorized assistance when taking a quiz, test, or exam, or when completing a graded assignment, whether the work is done in a classroom, a testing facility, or any other location;

       2.2.2. giving unauthorized assistance to a student taking a quiz, test, or exam, or completing a graded assignment, whether the work is done in a classroom, a testing facility, or any other location;

       2.2.3. substituting for another student, or allowing someone else to substitute for oneself, when taking a quiz, test, or exam, or when completing a graded assignment, whether the work is done in a classroom, a testing facility, or any other location;

       2.2.4. acquiring, by any means, a quiz, test, exam, or other course material before the instructor has authorized its use by the student in question;

       2.2.5. continuing to work after time has expired for a quiz, test, exam, or other graded assignment without authorization;

       2.2.6. submitting essentially the same work for credit in more than one course. (Exceptions may be possible with prior approval from instructors of all classes involved.)

2.3. Fraud is the deliberate misrepresentation of knowledge, or the source of that knowledge. The following behaviors are considered fraud:

       2.3.1. citing a source (book, article, etc.) that does not exist;

       2.3.2. citing a source for information that it does not contain;

       2.3.3. citing a source for a proposition that it does not support;

       2.3.4. identifying a source in a bibliography when the source is not cited in the text of the accompanying project;

       2.3.5. intentionally distorting the meaning or applicability of data beyond a legitimate range of interpretation;

       2.3.6. misrepresenting fictitious information as real.

2.4. Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use (intentional or otherwise) of language or ideas taken from an outside source (web page, book, article, film, television program, student essay, etc.) and presented for credit as one’s own. Submitting plagiarized work in any form is a breach of academic integrity, regardless of how much or little material has been borrowed. The following are common forms of plagiarism:

       2.4.1. plagiarism of words: using the exact words of a source (that is, verbatim copying of even as few as three consecutive words) without indicating that the words have been borrowed (usually by placing them within quotation marks and appropriately citing the source):

       2.4.2. plagiarism of ideas: presenting the unique ideas of a source without citing the source (at the very least by naming the source; or in a documented paper, by using in-text and bibliographic citation). As deemed appropriate by the instructor, exceptions may be made for encyclopedic or common knowledge information.

       2.4.3. patchwriting (combination of 2.4.1 and 2.4.2): copying and only partially changing the language from another source and presenting it as one’s own without necessary attribution and citation.

       2.4.4. “whole-cloth” plagiarism: misrepresenting the work of another person (an encyclopedia article, a friend’s essay, an essay purchased from someone, etc.) as one’s original work.

       2.4.5. unauthorized group work on an individual take-home exam, or other similar assignment for which group collaboration is explicitly prohibited by the instructor.

2.5. Attempted Dishonesty: An attempted act of academic dishonesty (even if unsuccessful) is also a violation of Academic Integrity and is subject to the same sanctions as outlined in 3.4.

2.6. Suspension: Suspension is a temporary separation from the College. It occurs as follows:

       2.6.1.      The student leaves Snow College for the rest of the semester;

       2.6.2.      The student receives a failing grade for the course in which the infraction occurred;

       2.6.3.      The student receives a UW for every other course in which they were enrolled at the time of the infraction; 

       2.6.4.      If the semester is more than 70% completed, the student must remain un-enrolled for an additional regular semester. 

2.7. Expulsion: Expulsion is a permanent separation from the College. It occurs as follows:

       2.7.1.      The student leaves Snow College immediately and may not be readmitted;

       2.7.2.      The student receives a failing grade for the course in which the infraction occurred;

       2.7.3.      The student receives a UW for every other course in which they were enrolled at the time of the infraction.

3.0 POLICY

3.1. Investigation and Reporting: 

       3.1.1. Instructors should investigate any suspicion of academic dishonesty in their students’ work. This expectation not only reflects the College’s high standards of academic integrity, but should also be recognized as being in the best interests of student learning and development. An instructor who has reason to believe that an act of academic dishonesty has occurred should gather the needed information to form a reasonable inference of the nature of the act. As circumstances permit, and as the instructor determines appropriate to the situation, this should include conferring directly with and/or clearly notifying the student(s) involved. In every case, the instructor should respect the privacy and dignity of any involved student(s).

       3.1.2. An instructor who is certain that an act of academic dishonesty has occurred should, for each student involved, file a Record of Academic Dishonesty with the Office of the Registrar. Although in significant and obvious cases of academic dishonesty a Record should be filed, in minor and/or less certain cases (ex: minor lapse in citation, inadvertent failure to fully credit a research source, etc.), an instructor may instead opt for addressing the infraction with the student within the purview of the class and without filing a Record. However, this decision is entrusted to the instructor on the basis of two criteria, prioritizing: 1) pedagogical value and effectiveness toward student learning; and 2) the College’s high standards of academic integrity.

       3.1.3. When a Record of Academic Dishonesty is filed, the instructor will notify each involved student, explain the significance and consequences of the infraction, as it applies to the particular class involve, and may also give them a copy of the Record. A Record of Academic Dishonesty should be filed within two weeks of the instructor’s discovery of the act in question. (When possible, a timelier filing is preferable, but it is also critical that instructors be allotted the time necessary to thoroughly investigate and properly confirm the details of the infraction before filing.)

       3.1.4. Upon receiving a Record of Academic Dishonesty, the Office of the Registrar will forward the case to the Academic Standards Committee for further review if a) it is a Level Two or Level Three Record and/or b) an appeal is submitted or hearing requested by the student. A Record of Academic Dishonesty is kept indefinitely on file in the Office of the Registrar unless it is removed by a successful appeal or, if the case is reviewed by the Academic Standards Committee, by a finding of not guilty.

3.2. Levels of Severity: Snow College recognizes three levels of academic dishonesty.

       3.2.1. Level-One: An act of academic dishonesty is considered Level-One when there is evidence that the act was committed spontaneously, under coercion, and is a first offence. (In such cases wherein the instructor files a Level One Record for a student who is then found to have a previous record of academic dishonesty, the Registrar will contact the instructor about adjusting the record to a Level-Two).  As appropriate the instructor may contact the Registrar’s office concerning previous infractions. This may result in the instructor adjusting the level of infraction.

An infraction (such as plagiarism) may also be considered Level One if the means by which it occurred required no special student effort to obtain (ex: a simple internet search, rather than work taken from an essay bank or purchased or taken illicitly from another student.)

       3.2.2. Level-Two: An act of Academic Dishonesty is considered Level-Two when there is greater evidence of premeditation, or when a student has previously committed a Level-One Infraction during their time at Snow College.

       3.2.3. Level-Three: An act of Academic Dishonesty is considered Level-Three when there is evidence that the act was committed in association with illegal activity (such as theft or vandalism) or commercial activity (such as purchasing an essay or paying a test substitute), or when a student has already committed multiple Level-One infractions or a Level-Two infraction during their time at Snow College.

A student who has been found guilty of a Level-Three infraction may be sanctioned by the Academic Standards Committee in one of the following ways:

                  1.      The student may be immediately suspended from the college;

                  2.      The student may be immediately expelled from the college.

3.3. Due Process: Any student accused of academic dishonesty will be notified of the accusation and has the right to dispute it. The exact means by which an accusation can be disputed varies with the severity of the infraction. All levels (1-3) should be reported through filing a Record of Academic Dishonesty with the Office of the Registrar.

       3.3.1. Level-One infractions are addressed by the instructor, usually in private consultation with the student. The instructor has sole discretion to determine what evidence shall be applied to the case and what sanctions shall be imposed, so long as those sanctions are within the instructor’s normal purview and are consistent with stated class policies, syllabus and/or  the College’s policy of Academic Integrity.

       3.3.2. Level-Two and Level-Three Infractions are investigated by the Academic Standards Committee. If the committee finds that an accusation has merit, it will schedule a hearing on a date that is reasonably convenient for all parties, and which gives the student (if the student wishes to appeal or contest the accusation) at least five business days to prepare a defense. If the student does not wish to contest the accusation, the committee may conduct the evaluation of the infraction(s) through email instead of a formal hearing as outlined in the Academic Standards Committee’s bylaws.

The hearing process must take place no later than one month (30 days) from the date on which the Record of Academic Dishonesty was filed, or by the fifth day of the following regular semester, whichever comes first. The student may be accompanied by an advisor of their choice, including legal counsel, who will be permitted to attend, but not directly participate in, the proceedings. A student who chooses to be accompanied by legal counsel shall notify the Chair of the Academic Standards Committee at least three business days before the hearing.

If the student does not attend the hearing, a decision of guilty or not guilty shall not be inferred by the presence or absence of the student, nor shall the student’s right to appeal the outcome of the hearing be denied.

The Chair of the Academic Standards Committee shall moderate the hearing.

During the hearing, the committee shall examine evidence and call witnesses. The student shall likewise have the right to present evidence and witnesses and to cross examine other witnesses.

Only factual evidence having an immediate bearing on the case at hand shall be admitted. However, other kinds of evidence may be admitted and reviewed at the discretion of the committee.

If the Academic Standards Committee agrees (by a vote, per committee bylaws) that there is a preponderance of evidence that the student has violated the College’s standards of Academic Integrity, the student shall be found guilty of Academic Dishonesty. Otherwise, the student shall be found not guilty.

3.4. Sanctions: The following sanctions shall be imposed for academic dishonesty.

       3.4.1. Level-One: Level-One Infraction is normally addressed by the instructor of the course. Sanctions may include a reduced or failing grade on the assignment, a failing grade for the course, or, as previously noted, any other                                         sanction that is within the normal purview and stated policies of the class and the College’s policy of Academic Integrity.

       3.4.2 Level-Two: A student who has been found guilty of a Level-Two infraction may be sanctioned by the Academic Standards Committee in one of the following ways:

                                  ●        The case may be remanded to the instructor, who may sanction the student as if the infraction were a Level-One;

                                  ●        The student may receive a failing grade for the course in which the infraction occurred;

                                  ●        The student may be immediately suspended from the college.

3.5. Additional Sanctions: Regardless of the outcome, a student suspected of violating other college policies or laws will be reported to the appropriate authorities.

3.6. Appeals: A student who is dissatisfied with the outcome of an Academic Dishonesty matter has the right to appeal.

       3.6.1. To appeal an instructor’s sanctions: A student who is dissatisfied with an instructor’s sanctions for academic dishonesty (whether or not an official Record is filed) must follow the appeals process outlined for any grade dispute.

       3.6.2. To appeal a Record of Academic Dishonesty: A student who wishes to dispute a Record of Academic Dishonesty should contact the Chair of the Academic Standards Committee to schedule a hearing. This hearing will be carried out as described in section 3.3.

       3.6.3. To appeal a sanction imposed by the Academic Standards Committee: A student who is dissatisfied with sanctions imposed for a Level Two or Three Infraction should contact the Chief Academic Officer (CAO). If the CAO determines that grounds for an appeal exist, they will create an ad hoc committee to hear the case.

       3.6.4. Legitimate grounds for appeal (either to the Academic Standards Committee or to the CAO) are as follows:

       3.6.4.1. Questions of fact. The student plans to argue that the facts presented at the original hearing were in error, or that new facts may lead to a different judgment.

       3.6.4.2. Questions of judgment. The student plans to argue that the Academic Honesty Policy has been misinterpreted.

       3.6.4.3. Questions of process. The student plans to argue that the process outlined in this policy has not been followed.

       3.6.4.4. Questions of fairness. The student plans to argue that the policy itself is unfair or has been applied unfairly.

       3.6.4.5. Questions of legality. The student plans to argue that the policy is unlawful or otherwise exceeds the powers of the College.

Academic Standards Policy

The Academic Standing Policy at Snow College is intended to ensure that students are making satisfactory academic progress toward completion of their academic goals. This policy seeks to identify students who need additional academic support and to direct those students to available services. A student’s academic status will be posted to their official academic transcript. However, each student attending Snow College is ultimately responsible for monitoring their satisfactory academic progress.

Academic Status

Good Standing

A student is considered in Good Standing when they have both a cumulative GPA and a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher.

Students who complete a program of at least 15 hours of Snow College credit numbered 1000 or above during the semester (transfer credit does not apply), and have a B+ (3.50) or higher GPA for that semester will be placed on the Academic Honors-Dean’s List.

A student who maintains a 3.50 or higher cumulative GPA at graduation will graduate with honors.

Academic Alert

A student is placed on Academic Alert when their term GPA is below 2.0, but their cumulative GPA remains above 2.0. Students placed on Academic Alert are encouraged to meet with their academic advisor to discuss the prior term’s challenges. 

Academic Warning

If a student’s cumulative GPA falls below a 2.0, they will be placed on Academic Warning. Students on Academic Warning should meet with their academic advisor to create an Academic Success Plan. It is recommended that a student on Academic Warning should not enroll in more than 16 credits. 

NOTE: A student receiving financial aid whose GPA falls below a 2.0 will be placed on financial aid probation. If, in any semester, a student’s GPA falls below a 1.0, the student will automatically be placed on No Further Aid by the Financial Aid Office.

Requirements for keeping a scholarship are stated clearly on the student’s scholarship contract and may differ from one award to another but are strictly enforced. It is a student's responsibility to know and understand his or her scholarship requirements.

Continued Academic Warning

Students remain on Academic Warning when their term GPA is above a 2.0, but their cumulative GPA remains below 2.0. Students on Continued Academic Warning should meet with their advisor to create an Academic Success Plan for the following term. It is recommended that a student on Continued Academic Warning should not enroll in more than 16 credits.

Academic Probation

If a student is on Academic Warning or Continued Academic Warning and does not achieve a term GPA  of at least 2.0,  they will be placed on Academic Probation. Students placed on Academic Probation will be limited to 13 credit hours per semester until they are in Good Standing.

Students placed on Academic Probation must meet with their Academic Advisor to establish an Academic Success Plan. A hold will be placed on the student’s account and will not be lifted until the student has created their success plan. 

NOTE: A student receiving financial aid whose GPA falls below a 2.0 a second time may be placed on No Further Aid.

Continued Academic Probation

Students remain on Academic Probation when their term GPA is above 2.0 while their cumulative GPA remains below 2.0. Students on Continued Academic Probation must meet with their advisor to revise their Academic Success Plan. Students placed on Continued Academic Probation will be limited to 13 credit hours per semester until they are in Good Standing. A hold will be placed on the student’s account and will not be lifted until the student has created their success plan.

Academic Suspension

A student earning below a 2.0 term GPA or failure to fulfill their Academic Success Plan while already on Academic Probation will be subject to Academic Suspension. This means the student will not be allowed to register for one regular (fall or spring) semester.

Students should create an Academic Success Plan with their academic advisor to successfully navigate their re-enrollment to Snow college once they’ve skipped one regular (fall or spring) semester. 

Appeals Process for Academic Suspension

A student subject to Academic Suspension may petition the Academic Standards Committee to be allowed to register. A written appeal must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the desired semester of attendance. 

Appeals denied by the Academic Standards Committee may continue to the Curriculum Committee.

NOTE: Financial aid satisfactory progress standards may differ.

Academic Renewal

For students challenged with a low GPA because they have experienced a period of low grades that does not reflect their academic potential, Snow College offers academic renewal. Academic renewal allows students the opportunity to recalculate their GPA by discounting grades of D+, D, D-, E, F, or UW which were earned five or more years prior to the date of petition. The following conditions apply:

  1. The applicant must be currently registered at Snow College, attending, and have tuition paid in full.
  2. Before applying for academic renewal and after readmission, the student must have completed at least 12 credits of graded coursework at Snow College and have earned at least a 2.5 GPA in all the courses taken after readmission.
  3. Students who have completed a certificate or degree may not petition for renewal of grades earned before the certificate or degree was awarded.
  4. Academic renewal may be applied only once during a student's academic career and is irreversible.
  5. "Renewed" courses do not complete General Education requirements nor count toward credits for graduation.
  6. "Renewed" courses remain on the student's transcript with a notation added to the transcript to indicate academic renewal. Grades are never removed from the transcript.
  7. Academic renewal does not apply to credit that is transferred into Snow College from another institution. Likewise, Snow College credit that is transferred to another institution will carry the original grades.

The Federal Higher Education Act will not allow academic renewal for federal financial aid purposes. Students who plan to apply for financial aid must contact the Financial Aid Office before requesting academic renewal.

Academic renewal cannot be used to make an otherwise ineligible athlete eligible. Only a student’s original grades are considered for athletic eligibility.

Academic renewal petition forms are available in the Registrar’s Office. A $25 processing fee applies to each petition.

Academic Credit

A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is not less than

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as approved by Snow College, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours. 

Repeating a Course

Some courses may be repeated to obtain a higher grade. Both courses will show on the academic record; however, only the most recent grade earned (not necessarily the highest grade) is calculated in the grade point average and the credit is only counted once. (A student wishing an earlier grade to count over a more recent one should submit an appeal to the Academic Standards Committee explaining his/her rationale for the change.) Retakes are limited to two per course (a total of 3 attempts at any one course). Once a retake has been completed, students need to contact the Registration Office to be sure the first grade is discounted from the GPA. Students must register and pay tuition for the semester in which the class is repeated. Hours earned in repeat courses may be counted toward graduation requirements only once. The exceptions to this policy are the courses designated as “repeatable” in the class schedule or catalog. These courses will be given credit each time the course is taken. Note: A course repeated at another institution cannot be used to change the GPA on a Snow College transcript.

Repeated Course Charges

By Board of Regents policy, the State of Utah requires that students be charged the “full cost of instruction” the third time they enroll in the same course. This means an additional charge of $100 will be charged per credit hour for the repeated class. Subsequent registrations in the course will also be assessed the $100 per credit hour charge. This policy does not apply to classes taken prior to Fall Semester 2002. This charge does not apply to courses that are repeatable as designated in the class schedule or catalog or to classes required to complete a program of study. Students may appeal to the Academic Standards Committee if they have extenuating circumstances that should be taken into consideration. These repeat course charges will be added to a student’s account after the semester commences.

Credit for Prior Learning

Students must be currently enrolled at Snow College to receive any credit by examination or petition. A maximum of thirty-two (32) semester hours of credit toward graduation from Snow College may be earned by examination in one or all of the following programs, i.e. Advanced Placement, Comprehensive Equivalency Examination, CLEP, FLATS, and International Baccalaureate. Please reference the Transfer Articulation section for more information. Students should be aware that if credit is received by exam, credit cannot also be received for enrolling in and completing the same course(s).

  • Prior Learning includes knowledge, competencies, and skills acquired through formal or informal education outside a traditional academic environment or at the initiative of the individual learner, including through participation in employer training programs, military service, and independent study.
  • Credit for Prior Learning is assessed by a proven, validated process through which faculty subject matter experts evaluate a student's previously learned competencies in a particular field and grant college credit when appropriate.
  • Credit for Prior Learning is determined by each department within the context of their mission, roles, student needs, and academic program. Undergraduate students must be admitted and enrolled at Snow College to be eligible to earn PLA credits. The number of credits earned through prior learning awarded may be limited. Some limitations may be imposed by the student degree plan.
  • Credit for Prior Learning is awarded through:
    • Transfer Credit (Block Transfer, Course-to-Course, Military) and/or
    • Proficiency Credit (Training, Certifications, 3rd party evaluations, Standardized exams, Credit by Exams, Institutional Exams and Individualized Assessments (proficiency exam)). Students must be currently enrolled at Snow College to receive any Credit by Exams or petition. A maximum of thirty-two (32) semester hours of credit toward graduation from Snow College may be earned by examination in one or all of the following programs. Students who feel they have sufficient competence and wish to pass a Credit by Exam in a given course should follow the below procedures:
      • Contact the course instructor. The instructor and the department dean must approve the credit by examination request. The instructor must prepare and administer the exam. Some classes may not be challenged;
      • Pay a fee at the cashier's office;
      • Take the credit-by-exam form and receipt to the instructor and take the final exam. Students must earn the equivalent of a C grade to receive credit for the course.
      • The course will not have a grade reported on the student’s transcript but will show as Credit By Exam
  • Accepted forms of prior learning assessments include:

Additional Prior Learning Assessment Opportunities Include:

  • American Council on Education (ACE)
  • Joint Service Transcripts (Military Transcripts)
  • Departmental Approved Prior Learning Assessments
    • Third party or industry certification such as the FLATS, P.O.S.T
    • Student portfolio, documented experience
    • Department or institutional proficiency exams

More about Prior Learning

Credit earned for prior learning at a Utah System of Higher Education (USHE) institution is transferable to Snow College on the same basis as if the credit had been earned through regular study at the awarding USHE institution. Credit for prior learning will not be assessed for the purpose of receiving credit for a course in which Snow College does not offer. Additionally, credit will not be awarded if it duplicates credit that has been previously earned. Students should be aware that if credit is received by exam, credit cannot also be received for enrolling in and completing the same course(s). Credit for prior learning is recorded on a Snow College transcript as Transfer Credit awarded as Credit for Prior Learning and will receive a TR or transfer grade. This grade does not affect the Grade Point Average (GPA). Transfer credit and Proficiency credit will incur a service fee charge of $10 per credit. Proficiency credits of prior learning may incur associated exam or portfolio review fees. Federal financial aid and employee tuition reimbursement may not cover prior learning assessment fees.

International Transcripts

Students who have earned credit at a foreign post-secondary institution may be eligible for transfer credit. International transcripts must be evaluated by an approved foreign credential evaluation company. Snow College's preferred evaluation company is SpanTran. If you have already had your international transcript evaluated by a foreign credential company, please contact the Registrar's Office at 435-283-7230. Only courses that are equivalent to Snow College's general education courses and direct equivalencies to a student's specific program of choice will be accepted toward a degree. Granting elective credit may be handled on a case by case basis. Select SpanTran Credential Evaluation to start your evaluation.

Transfer Students Requiring Completed General Education Certification

Any Utah System of Higher Education (USHE) institution shall consider its General Education requirements completed by transfer students who have completed the General Education requirements of any other USHE institution. Upon request by transferring students, a sending institution shall provide certification when students have fully completed its General Education requirements.

Academic Appeals

If students wish to petition for exceptions to a college academic policy, they should be aware of the following:

  1. Appeals for exceptions to graduation or General Education requirements should be submitted to the Curriculum Committee Chair.  Appeals dealing with financial aid exceptions should be submitted to the Financial Aid Office.  Appeals dealing with exceptions to academic policies should be made to the Academic Standards Committee as laid out below.  If you are unsure where to submit your appeal, speak with an academic advisor. 
  2. Please note the statute of limitation for appealing academic policies is one year.  Please indicate on the appeal form if you'd like an exception to the statute of limitation.
  3. Exceptions to policy are only considered in cases of circumstances beyond a student's control.  Procrastination, forgetfulness, or ignorance of published policy are not acceptable reasons for exceptions.
  4. If you wish to make an appeal to the Academic Standards Committee, first discuss your options with an academic advisor (or advisor from Office of Disability Services, Title IX Office, or other advising office as relevant).
  5. Use the Academic Appeal Form available online https://academicappeal.snow.edu/  This form requires a login (using your BadgerWeb username and password).  For help with logging in, contact the IT Office.
  6. Be sure to obtain and upload a memo from an advisor, the Office of Disability Services, or the Title IX Office, which indicates you have met with someone before submitting the appeal (required).
  7. You will also need to obtain and upload additional supporting documentation.  This may include a supporting letter from a faculty member, an add/drop form, medical documentation, evidence of circumstance (such as a funeral or death), etc.
  8. It could be helpful to your request to be available when the Academic Standards Committee meets to answer possible questions.  If so, indicate on the appeal form; you will be contacted about a meeting location and time.
  9. The results of your appeal will be mailed or e-mailed to you following the committee's decision.

Alternate Final Exams Times

A request to take a final exam at any time other than when it is officially scheduled must be initiated with the professor of the course. The Dean or Department Chair with oversight over the course must approve the request. A charge of $50.00 per exam will be assessed if the request is approved. Students are strongly discouraged from taking early final exams.

Excused Examinations

Students excused from school during an examination for approved school functions, will be allowed to take make-up examinations if the appropriate excused absence form has been signed by the instructor. Make-up examinations for other reasons will be at the discretion of the teacher, who will be the sole judge of the situation.

In addition, if a student has 3 or more officially scheduled final exams on the same day, they may request a change without paying a fee by contacting the office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, Noyes Building, room 310.

Excused Absence Policy

While consistent class attendance and participation are essential to academic success, there are occasions where a student is not able to attend due to an excused absence. An excused absence includes:

  • participation in a college-sponsored or sanctioned activity or artistic performance (e.g., course-related field trips)
  • students participating as representatives of Snow College at academic events (e.g., ambassadors)
  • participation as an athlete, manager, or trainer in NJCAA intercollegiate competitions,
  • in compliance with military duties, legal proceedings, emergency law enforcement, or jury duty
  • accommodation or other support requests, as negotiated with the Office of Disability Services
  • injury, illness, medical or mental condition or status that is too severe or contagious for the student to participate in class (an absence for a non-acute or elective medical service does not constitute an excused absence)
  • pregnancy and related conditions as deemed medically necessary by the student’s medical provider and in accordance with Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972
  • major injury, illness, or medical condition/status or a death in a student’s immediate family
  • religious holiday observance according to Utah SB 244 (Link to this policy)
  • extreme emergencies that are outside of the student's control (a natural disaster, a fire at their home, being the victim of a crime or domestic violence, a family tragedy, or a related incident; this does NOT include attendance at a wedding, a family vacation, obligations related to work, or other such matters).
Scheduled Activities:

For activities whose schedules are known prior to the start of the semester, a student should provide their instructors with a written schedule during the first week of the semester showing days they expect to miss class. An instructor may determine that recurring, frequent, or lengthy absences will interfere with a student's ability to succeed in the course and recommend that the student seek an alternative. No events may be scheduled during final exam periods; exceptions to this must have prior approval by Dean’s Council.

Documentation:

At the discretion of the instructor, as outlined in the course syllabus, documentation affirming the date and time of the excused absence may be required. This could be a note from a health care professional, letter from the office of disability services, documentation from the athletics

department or field trip coordinator, jury duty summons, court subpoena, military order, and other forms of documentation.

Student Responsibility:

It is the responsibility of the student to arrange with the instructor an opportunity to complete missed assignments, activities, and labs that will be missed during excused absences. Students should notify the instructor in writing at the earliest advanced notice of the classes they will miss due to an excused absence. In cases where advance notification is not feasible (e.g., accident or emergency), the student must provide notification by the end of the second working day after the absence. This notification should include an explanation of why notice could not be sent prior to the class. Excused absences can usually be anticipated, and the student should be prepared to complete course work prior to the absence. Students are responsible for all material covered in classes missed, even when their absences are excused. Students should be aware that excessive absences, whether excused or unexcused, may affect their ability to do well in class. Absences exceeding 20% of class meetings, may no longer qualify as excused.

Students falsifying information to obtain an excused absence or sharing information about a make-up examination or other materials with other students is in violation of Snow College’s Student Code of Conduct and is subject to disciplinary action.

Instructor Responsibility:

Upon request, instructors are responsible for providing students with a reasonable and equitable opportunity to complete work due to an excused absence. Students are responsible for developing a plan to complete missed activities and assignments with input from instructors. Instructors may require work to be completed prior to the absence; however, they are encouraged to work with the student to determine a schedule that gives the student appropriate time to complete the work. Instructors may not directly penalize students for participation points accrued during the excused absence without providing comparable alternatives. Instructors are encouraged to be flexible and understanding of students' lives; for example, requests for documentation may introduce inequalities and impinge on the student’s privacy. Furthermore, there are reasons that an absence is not documentable (e.g., short-term illness, family tragedies) and instructors are encouraged to use their best judgment in evaluating student requests.

Instructors concerned with a student's absences may contact the Dean of Students.

Travel Leader Responsibility:

Faculty and staff that would like students to be excused from other classes for curricular, performance, athletic, recruiting, or other reasons, are asked to notify their faculty colleagues in advance. This can be done with an email sent by your dean or supervisor who have the ability to send faculty-wide messages. This email should include a list of students who will be missing class, the dates and times they will be gone, and a statement that the students are expected to contact their teachers before leaving to make arrangements for missed work. Travel leaders should work with their students to be responsible for their absences. For re-occurring absences, such as athletic events, it is recommended that a notification is sent for each individual event. This will help clarify which students are excused (e.g. if a student athlete is injured and will not be traveling, that student should not be excused from classes) and times they will be excused (e.g. a student will only be excused starting at 3 pm the day of the event, not 10 am).

Appeals:

Any student who has presented the instructor with adequate substantiating evidence of an excused absence and feels they have been treated unfairly concerning absences may appeal. Any appeal must be initiated within one week of the instructor’s decision. In the appeal process, the burden of proof shall be on the student. Appeals should be submitted to the department chair or dean with oversight over the course.